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Collecting Gun Digest: The Greatest Gun Annual

Collecting Gun Digest: The Greatest Gun Annual/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d2ba7c8a_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d2ba7c8a_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } When I was a wee slip of a lad back in the days of Herman’s Hermits and Mr. Ed, two publications comprised the bulk of my literary diet: Boris Karloff’s Tales of Mystery and Gun Digest . The Karloff magazine (well, comic book, actually) is long out of print, but Gun Digest just keeps chugging along. And I hope it always will. Saying Plenty The author found a first annual edition of Gun Digest at an estate sale in rural Ontario. The find demonstrates the broad interest of the publication. Gun Digest was — and is — the 900-pound gorilla of firearms annuals. It didn’t matter if you were a handgunner, trap-shooter, historian, hunter, collector or even a rotten little kid from Indiana — Gun Digest always had something for you. This breadth of content no doubt accounted for the annual’s amazing distribution and enduring popularity. In what other annual could you find articles by Elmer Keith, Jack O’Connor, Maj. George Nonte, Warren Page, Lucian Cary and dozens of other towering figures in shooting literature? No wonder Gun Digest had a world-wide following. In fact, it’d be surprising if it didn’t. True story: In Fall 2005, my wife and I were in Guelph, Ontario, visiting my daughter at college. After our visit, we meandered back along the Queen’s Expressway. Outside some tiny little burg in the middle of a vast expanse of wheat fields, we passed a hand-painted sign saying, “Estate Sale.” I have a helluva hard time passing up a sign like that, so we turned off the expressway and sped up a little dirt road. After a few miles, we pulled up to an outdoor sale held in the backyard of a seedy little farmhouse, complete with peeling paint and a washline strung between two rusty poles. And what a sale it was. As I passed up tables containing such things as an original glass-topped burial case (shoulda bought that) and a King four-valve sousaphone (shoulda bought that), I came upon a medium-sized stack of Gun Digests . The stack contained an original first edition, a 1964 issue autographed by editor John Amber and a brand-new 2005 issue edited by my friend and co-worker Ken Ramage. Related GunDigest Articles Gun Digest Store Updates May Affect You Gun Digest's Top 10 Gun Collecting Articles Photo Gallery: 20 Semi-Auto Handguns of Gun Digest 2015 I bought them all, of course. I was higher than a kite on the trip home, and as I floated along, I got to thinking: What does it say about Gun Digest that some old Canadian farmer living in a shack in the middle of Nowhere, Ontario, held onto a first edition, an autographed edition and a brand-spankin’-new 2005 edition until the day he died? It says plenty. Enduring Appeal I suppose the firearms journal of record is American Rifleman magazine. It’s a great magazine, for sure. But in terms of annuals, Gun Digest is unique. It has consistently contained work by the biggest names in the business, and it’s invaluable as a year-by-year trend tracker. Pull down almost any year, and you’ll be able to sit back with master writers, whose names run the gamut from A to Z; from John Amber to Don Zutz. I have an enduring interest in guns of all types. Yet the days are rapidly ending when I feel comfortable shucking out a handful of hundreds for this revolver or that shotgun. Yet I have discovered a simple pleasure; one in which I can indulge at minimal cost: collecting Gun Digests . In fact, I must admit I’ve gotten more pure pleasure from collecting Gun Digest than from any gun I’ve ever bought. Founded in 1944, Gun Digest had wide appeal in a time when many people couldn't afford to buy firearms. But they sure loved reading about them. Gun Digest was founded in 1944 by Milton P. Klein, owner of a major Chicagoland sporting-goods store. Guns were in short supply in those World War II years, and Klein reasoned that if people couldn’t buy new guns, perhaps they’d like to read about them. So Klein engaged Charles R. Jacobs to whip up some publication he could sell. Ramage, the current editor of Gun Digest , picks up the story from there: “That first edition, 164 pages including covers, included not only catalog-type listings for rifles, pistols and shotguns, but a number of firearms and shooting sports articles by some of the well-known writers of the time: Jack O’Connor, C.S. Landis, Maj. Charles Askins, Maurice H. Decker, E.B. Mann, etc. That edition’s format, published under the direction of GD’s first editor, Charles R. Jacobs, laid the keel for the book’s basic direction through the following decades. The next three editions were very similar in makeup and presentation. “After the fourth edition, a new editor was named, and the book was further refined. The fifth edition appeared in 1951 with a whopping 224 pages between four-color covers (showing an engraved and gold-inlaid S&W .357 Magnum revolver). At the editorial helm was John T. Amber. A study of the contents lineup shows there are more articles, and the contents are organized into major topic sections. Joining the contributors were Elmer Keith, Roy Weatherby, Charles Askins, Ray Riling, E. M. Ferris and Maj. Gen. J.S. Hatcher.

Manticore Scorpion Mags Shot Show

Manticore Scorpion Mags  Shot Show

I’m a Scorpion nut. I’ve owned both the rifle and pistol variants of the weapon and absolutely love it as my primary pistol caliber carbine. One of the weak points was the magazines. The polymer feed lips broke quite often in some of the earlier sets of magazines. This problem has long been fixed with CZ’s magazines but metal feed lips will always outclass polymer. (At least for now.)  Manticore is going to be releasing their Scorpion mags and they will be outfitted with lovely metal feed lips. Steel feed lips Scorpion Mags Like traditional CZ Scorpion mags, they are translucent and mostly made from polymer. Unlike CZ’s Scorpion mags they have metal feed lips and fit 32 rounds instead of 30. This gives you an extra double tap when you need it most Manticore arms is pretty well known for making good gear and I’ve never heard anything wrong about Sven and his company. The Old Scorpion magazine I’m a major fan of Lancer magazines and these seem like the CZ variant of Lancer magazines. I really can’t wait for these to hit the market. These are made for Manticore, but will be hitting Prepper Gun shop and sold through them. They will be clear and smoke as well. They’ll be available by the end of first quarter 2017.

Vortex SPARC II: More Red Dot Bang For Your Buck

Vortex SPARC II: More Red Dot Bang For Your Buck

In an article I wrote a few months ago, we looked at the pros and cons of the Trijicon MRO, a rugged, reliable and dependable red dot sight system that has all the bells and whistles but can be a real tough sell — simply because it costs too much. Today, we’re going to take a look at one of the more budget-friendly red dot sight options currently on the market that’s sure to delight the tacticool cheapskate in all of us firearms enthusiasts: the Vortex SPARC II. An American-owned and family owned and operated business from south central Wisconsin, Vortex Optics was started by owners Dan and Margie Hamilton as a small sporting goods retail store in the mid 1980s. For over a decade and a half the retail store business kept growing and growing until 2002, which is when their optics business was formally established. The company boasts of 200 American team members and is one of the more well-known brands in the tactical and birding/observation market. They have a ton of different rifle scopes , red dot sights, range finders, binoculars, spotting scopes and other optics available. Their SPARC line of optics are among their entry-level red dot sights. SPARC is a fancy abbreviation which stands for “ Speed Point Aiming for Rapid Combat “. As far as labels, it sounds a little too redundant, unoriginal, cheesy even. But I don’t care too much about semantics. What’s important to me is a product’s value proposition, and when it comes to value, the SPARC II really shines. But before we get into value, let’s get all the technical details out of the way as fast as possible, shall we? @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 Vortex SPARC II Specs 2 Conclusion Vortex SPARC II Specs Magnification 1x Objective Lens Diameter 22mm Eye Relief Unlimited Eye Relief Adjustment Graduation 1 MOA Travel per Rotation 45 MOA Max Elevation Adjustment 90 MOA Max Windage Adjustment 90 MOA Parallax Setting Parallax Free Length 3.1 inches Width (at widest points) ~2 inches Weight 5.9 ounces The SPARC II is an upgraded version of the original SPARC red dot sight, itself another good bang-for-buck option — which was great but didn’t quite meet the standards of Vortex Optics. They decided to develop the next generation SPARC optic based on customer feedback. Dimensions The SPARC II weighs in at around 5.9 ounces without any of the mounts attached. Attaching the tall mount, it weighs around 7.125 ounces . The overall length of the housing from rear to front lens is 3.75 inches, the height from the bottom to the top of the housing measures exactly 1.1 inches and the width from the widest points measures around 2 inches. Housing The lens on the SPARC II are tightly fitted in a tough housing machined from a single piece of solid aircraft-grade aluminum, which is what makes it rugged and very durable. It’s been shown to survive multiple drop tests by several owners without breaks or cracks on the housing. The housing has an anodized matte black finish, which looks very nice especially when considering that it’s just a budget-oriented red dot sight. What’s Included Out of the box, the SPARC II comes with two mounts, a spacer, a hex key and a torques wrench, lots of screws for different mount heights, two flip-up caps that are easily removable (and also fits the SPARC I), a cleaning cloth and one free CR2032 3-volt battery. The shorter 18-millimeter mount can be used for mounting the SPARC II to a shotgun or even a drilled and tapped revolver with a rail system, while the taller 37-millimeter mount can be used for mounting the SPARC II to any flat-top AR-15 giving absolute co-witness. The included spacer measures 3 millimeters tall and can be used to raise the 18-millimeter mount to 21 millimeters . It can also raise the 37-millimeter mount to 40 millimeters if the user desires a lower 1/3 co-witness on any flat-top AR-15. To see how co-witnessing works in a nutshell, feel free to reference a portion of the Trijicon MRO article I mentioned earlier. The included mounts are great, both are compatible with picatinny or weaver type rail systems, but should the user require quick-detach mounts, the SPARC II is compatible with the Aimpoint T1 and any other aftermarket mounts similar to the T1. Controls and adjustments The elevation adjustment turret sits on top of the housing while the windage adjustment turret is on the right side, just next to the battery compartment. All protective caps for the adjustment turrets and the battery are tethered to the SPARC II’s main housing so the user doesn’t have to worry about losing any of them. Both turrets’ openings are O-ring sealed making them dust-proof and water-proof. There are a total of 90 MOA of adjustments both for windage and elevation. The adjustment graduation is 1 MOA per click. The caps have a little bar on top that can be used to turn the turrets in a pinch, but it would be easier to just turn the turrets using the rim of a spent shell or a quarter. Still, it’s there if the user will ever need it. The red dot digital control buttons of the SPARC II are housed in a thick rubber housing on the right side. These are two rear-facing buttons each with arrow, one pointing up and the other pointing down. Both buttons’ openings are also O-ring sealed. The button with the arrow pointing up increases the brightness intensity level of the red dot and also serves as the on/off switch, while the one with the arrow pointing down decreases the brightness intensity level. The daylight-bright red dot is very easy to see in the lens, it’s a small 2 MOA red dot. There are a total of 10 levels of brightness intensity on the daylight-bright red dot . When turning on, it returns to the last brightness intensity level used. Another notable thing about the red dot is it returns to zero by simply dismounting and re-installing the SPARC II. Objective and Ocular Lenses The SPARC II’s objective and ocular lenses both measure 22 millimeters in diameter with a 1x magnification. All internal and external surfaces of these lenses are multicoated . They’re de-gased with nitrogen gas to keep out all the oxygen in the environment. This makes the SPARC II fog-proof and water-proof and gives superb clarity and brightness to the lens. The objective lens has an unlimited eye relief (in the manual, Vortex Optics recommends mounting the SPARC II with at least a 4-inch long eye relief) and is also parallax-free , which means no matter which angle you look from behind the sights, the red dot will always be at the point of impact (within reason of course). A thing to note about the 1x magnification. The original SPARC I red dot had a 2x magnifier which screws directly to the scope, but the eye relief wasn’t great and field of view is just real awful. For those reasons, Vortex Optics decided to do away with the 2x magnifier so currently, the SPARC II has no option for magnification . The SPARC II has been tested to withstand temperatures as low as -4 °F and as high as 158 °F , making it excellent for any combat or hunting situation. Because of the rugged shock-proof housing, when mounted correctly, the red dot will stay on target no matter what. Battery As mentioned earlier, the SPARC II uses a single CR2032 3-volt battery, which is very common and easy to come by. This is one huge improvement compared to the SPARC I which used a rather obscure CR2354 3-volt battery. One advantage of the SPARC II is it’s easy to get to the battery, the battery cap can easily be turned by hand (unlike the one on the original SPARC I and a lot of other red dot sights on the market that require a tool to open). The tether on the SPARC II’s battery cap rides on the inside of the groove, retaining the cap. The SPARC II boasts of a 300-hour battery life on the highest brightness level setting and a 5,000-hour battery life on the lowest brightness setting . If not turned off for 12 continuous hours, the circuit will automatically shut itself off to save battery life. Pricing and Warranty — the differentiating factors Currently on Vortex Optics’ website , a Vortex SPARC II is selling for $259.99 brand new, which oddly enough is priced exactly the same as the original (and rather inferior of a product) SPARC I . But from online firearms, hunting and accessory stores like 3RiversPrecision, these could be purchased for just $200.00. What sets the SPARC II (or any Vortex Optics product for that matter) apart from the competition is it comes with Vortex Optics’ consumer-friendly VIP Warranty. On their website, Vortex Optics state that they will repair or replace any of their product in the event it becomes damaged or defective at no charge to the owner. If the product can’t be repaired for some reason, they will replace it with the same model in perfect working order of equal or better physical condition. This is a no-questions-asked type of warranty — it doesn’t matter how or why it broke, where it was purchased and who purchased it (which means the warranty is fully transferable). As long as it’s a Vortex Optics product, their VIP Warranty covers it for life. Vortex Optics requires no warranty card to fill out and no receipt. Of course if your SPARC II was lost or stolen or if it only has cosmetic damage that doesn’t affect how it performs, the VIP Warranty won’t cover it. Pros and Cons In case you’re looking to make a purchase but want more info besides the technical specs detailed above, I came up with a list of the SPARC II’s pros and cons to help you make an informed decision. Pros: Value for money: the SPARC II includes two mounts and an optional riser. Scope caps are also included. For the price, it just can’t be beat. Rugged and reliable: the SPARC II is shock-proof, water-proof, nitrogen-purged and will work in any combat or hunting condition. Unlike its predecessor, it uses a common, easy-to-find battery: a single CR2032 3-volt. The control layout is simplified and very intuitive. Like other higher end red dot sights, the SPARC II has unlimited eye relief and is parallax-free. You can’t lose the caps because they’re tethered. Its windage and elevation turret caps have an adjustment tool built in to them — you won’t need a screwdriver or a quarter to operate the turrets. The lens is multicoated and gives a very clear and crisp sight picture. The red dot is plenty bright enough. A few users claims that even when pointing the red dot to the sun, it could still be clearly seen. Vortex Optics wasn’t joking when they labeled this product the SPARC II Bright Red Dot Sight. The red dot is easy to pick up being a 2 MOA dot, a feature only the relatively more expensive red dot sight products should have. It maintains its zero. To reset its zero it only needs to be dismounted and re-installed. It’s compatible with Aimpoint T1 quick-detach mounts and other similarly-modeled mounts. The Vortex Optics VIP Warranty is just unrivaled. And their aftermarket customer support is top-notch being an American-owned and operated company. Cons: These optics are made in China. If that doesn’t sit well with you for whatever reason, feel free to look for other red dot sights. The brightness level up and down control buttons are kind of stiff and not as responsive as some people would like them to be. But these same people also acknowledged that the choice to use stiffer rubber might actually be a good thing as far as durability. Some users report that the tethers tends to bind at times. Taking the caps off and putting them back on can be difficult because of this. Sure, you won’t worry about losing the caps, but it might come at a price. If you prefer a dial to adjust the brightness intensity (like that of the Trijicon MRO), the two digital control rear-facing buttons might not appeal to you. Some users complain that the dot can be either too dim or too bright. I personally think it’s a matter of preference. In the dark, when the SPARC II is pointed at someone, they will see the red dot. This shouldn’t not be too bothersome to you if you’re not the mall ninja type, or if you are purchasing it for your hunting rig. Some people complain about the appearance of the red dot and say refresh rate might be too slow. It was reported that users noticed a trail of the red dot when transitioning their aim quickly from one target to another. Another one on the rumor mill, when focusing on the red dot, instead of appearing like a solid red dot, it tends to look like a series of small fiber optic lights but as soon as the user focuses on the target, the red dot reportedly becomes solid again. Red dot sights in general are not good for people with astigmatism. The red dot won’t appear as clear or crisp. The SPARC II is reported to give the “starburst effect”. There is an ongoing debate as to whether the this effect is caused by astigmatism or by the product itself. Some people claiming they don’t have astigmatism complain that they do experience the starburst effect. I would personally have to dismiss this claim as another matter of preference. Conclusion Just looking at the list of pros and cons, we see 13 real advantages and only one real disadvantage — the caps’ tethers could (and sometimes do) bind. I can’t care less about which country a product was manufactured in or where it came from so long as the value is there. I also don’t have astigmatism. And I’m not a taticool guy — I’ve always carried a commander-size all-steel 1911 without a rail. Outside of the pros and cons list, there is one thing about the SPARC II that no person who want more bang for their hard-earned buck can deny: VALUE. It screams value in every direction: ruggedness, durability, reliability, price and warranty. I can talk all day about the law of supply and demand and how it affects all but the richest people on the planet but at the end of the day, the Vortex SPARC II gets my vote for all the reasons mentioned above. If you’re in the market for a no-frills workhorse of a red dot sight that you can mount on your home defense or hunting AR-15 rig and budget is a primary concern, the SPARC II should be on top of your list. Related Reads: Vortex Strikefire 2 Review Vortex Diamondback Spotting Scope Vortex Strike Eagle Scope 4.3/5 (3 Reviews) Mike Ramientas A firearms and ballistics enthusiast and an outdoorsman, Mike is one of Gun News Daily's best contributing authors. He's a researcher, data analyst and writer by trade and strongly adheres to conservatism—a stalwart of the right to keep and bear arms. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Man Upset He Cant Draw His Revolver at a Holster Booth During NRAAM

Man Upset He Cant Draw His Revolver at a Holster Booth During NRAAM

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s JOHNSON CITY, TN — Local man Marshall Tuckerson, age 73, voiced his disgust at the cancellation of this year’s NRA Annual Meeting (NRAAM) in Nashville, TN. Previously scheduled for April 16-19, 2020, the event was shuttered over COVID-19 concerns. “I won’t be able to quickly draw my loaded .38 Special at unsuspecting holster booth salesmen to see if it fits their Tubberware models,” Tuckerson lamented. Local Man at NRA Holster Booth The 149th NRAAM typically draws crowds of near 80,000 (last Nashville event) and does not have restrictions against carrying if the user follows local and state laws. Tuckerson continued, “I’ll miss seeing the whites of people’s eyes as I unsnap my Uncle Mike’s nylon behind-the-back holster and keep my finger on the trigger.” Disclaimer: This is a satire/parody post, which may or may not use actual names in quasi-real and/or fictitious narration. So try not to get too butt-hurt about it.  Also…April 1st. Pandemic Barter Rates of Common Ammo Man Doesn’t Realize Personal Hygiene First to Go While Waiting for the Collapse of Society Gun Owner Excited Liberal Friends Now Into Guns; Exhausted As Only Source of Information What’s real…is our AGGRESSIVE GUN PHRASE T-SHIRT . Requested by tons of readers after we kept using it in funny posts.

Best AR-10 Lowers [2020] Comprehensive Overview

The AR platform is widely used and loved among firearm enthusiasts because of the customizability it offers. By law, the lower receiver of an AR-10 rifle is considered to be the firearm itself. That’s because it houses the fire control group. The AR-10 is a precision shooting rifle , intended to fire the heavy .308 caliber. Thus, accuracy and precision are of prime importance, which inevitably are widely provided by the lower receiver. Here we’ll learn about the qualities of a good AR-10 lower receiver, its ideal manufacturing process, and the compatibility between AR-10 and AR-15 lowers. The article will also review the best AR-10 lower receivers on the market to help you make your buying decision. Comparison of the Best AR-10 Lowers IMAGE PRODUCT Our Top Pick Aero Precision - 308 AR M5 Lower Receiver Billet machined from 7075 T6 aluminium with precise cuts Black hard-coat anodized Mil 8625 Type 3 Class 2 finish Bolt catch threaded for screw pin to eliminate roll pin View Latest PriceRead Customer Reviews Cross Machine Tool Co., Inc. - 308 AR Stripped Billet Upper & Lower Receiver Set Stripped billet upper and lower receiver combo set Receiver set uses standard DPMS type .308 lower parts Ultra-flared magwell on lower is wire EDM cut "View Latest Price" → "Read Customer Reviews" How to Choose a Great AR-10 Lower The AR-10 lower, can either be a simple CNC-machined chunk of metal or a full-fledged, functioning firearm. The complete AR-10 lower houses a few components which include the trigger group, pistol grip , fire selector, magwell, and the buffer tube catch. Some other points to consider when choosing an AR-10 lower are its compatibility with different uppers and the availability of magazines . Let’s talk about them one by one. Platform The very first and most basic factor to consider is the platform of your AR-10 lower. Since unlike the AR-15, AR-10s are not widely used,  there are only a few standardization options for it. Source AR-10 has two major platforms, namely the DPMS - LR 308 and the Armalite AR-10. If you are upgrading your lower, check and choose the right platform, so you subsequently don’t have to change other components. Customization Another thing to consider is customization. Some people like to use ready-made lowers, while some like to machine them, as buying a complete lower requires an FFL, whereas an 80% lower doesn’t. However, buying a finished lower ensures precision, saves time, and covers you with a warranty. Trigger Guard Furthermore, a good AR-10 lower must have an integrated trigger guard. Although many people like to use a trigger guard of their own choice, an already integrated trigger guard provides for a stronger lower. Forged vs. Billet Lowers - Which is Ideal? We need a bit of iron-smith compendium on this one. AR-10 lowers, and likely any other lower receivers for that matter, are manufactured by any of the three production methods. These include billet shaping, forging, and casting. Casting refers to pouring molten metal into a cast or die to give it a shape. This metal obtained from casting is quite brittle and of bad quality. Billet shaping requires the use of CNC machines to shape a solid chunk of metal into the desired shape. The metal here is already prepared, so it's just cutting and lathing it. Finally, the last method is forging, a procedure which has been used for centuries for crafting metal. Forged receivers are considered to be (and are obviously) better than billet ones. Source VS. Source The reason is that, while forging, hot metal is regularly heated and beaten up, which causes its grain to mix, making it firmer and less brittle. The receivers manufactured using billet method are very clean and aesthetically pleasing. Forged AR-10 lowers, on the other hand, are technically a bit harder and more durable than billet ones. So if you have a choice, you should go for a forged lower. However, the takeaway is that none of this matters. It's just a matter of mental satisfaction. That’s because billet receivers have never been reported or seen to underperform compared to forged ones, although there’s still a slight margin. If you are more into hunting and using your rifle outdoors, subjecting it to tough use, you must opt for a forged receiver. If you are more inclined toward competitions and precision shooting, billet receivers will be a good choice for you. Additionally, billet receivers are more aesthetically pleasing. AR-10 vs AR-15 Lower Compatibility Source VS. Source If you are looking to use or swap the lower receiver components among AR-15 and AR-10 rifles, unfortunately, you’re going to be disappointed. There’s a simple reason behind this. The calibers of the AR-10 and AR-15 don’t match. The AR-15 fires the .223 REM whereas the AR-10 shoots .308, which is a heavier and larger bullet. Hence, the parts of the AR-10 lower are designed to accommodate and fire these rounds. Most parts of the lower receiver are not interchangeable between AR-10 and AR-15 , whereas some of them are. First, let's talk about the parts that are not interchangeable. The magazine, the magazine catch, the takedown pins, the bolt catch, and the pistol grips are unique to each platform. AR Diagram (Source) The magazine of an AR-10 houses .308 cartridges whereas the AR-15 holds .223. The magazine, as well as the magazine well of the AR-10 lower, is hence, bigger for the AR-10 magazines. The AR-10 was primarily designed for combat, which requires it to have larger parts. Due to its firepower and caliber, the AR-10 is somewhat bigger than an AR-15, which means the takedown pins and bolt catch are also bigger, and it's impossible to swap them. The pistol grips are also not interchangeable due to the difference in size. Finally, it leaves us with the trigger springs and the trigger. These are the only parts you can interchange between the AR-10 and the AR-15 rifles. Quick Take - The Best AR-10 Lowers These are our recommendations for the best lowers for the AR-10: Aero Precision - 308 AR M5 Lower Receiver "Cross Machine Tool" Co., Inc. - 308 AR "Stripped Billet Upper" & Lower Receiver Set Reviews of the Best AR-10 Lowers Below are the three best AR-10 lowers currently on the market. You should make notes of any characteristics and features of each one. This way, you’ll be able to find out which one matches the description of your ideal AR-10 lower. Find one that is close and you’ll know for sure that it will be a winner. Now we’re going to switch gears and take a look at our top picks for the best AR-10 lowers. Let’s see what products made our list and why. Now, we'll start with the first lower on our list: Best Overall: Aero Precision - 308 AR M5 Lower Receiver CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Durable and tough finish Aesthetically pleasing Good value for money Works with most other components on the market Cons Might require fitting What Recent Buyers Report A lot of recent buyers were happy overall. They said this was perfect for building their AR-10 rifles from the ground up. For others who were using this for an upgrade, the fitting was nice and tight. The lower receiver components fit without any issues, according to these new users. One user was smart enough to purchase drop-in accessories for a lower receiver prior to purchasing this. Why it Stands Out to Us This lower receiver is made from high-quality materials, like polymer. It also includes a mag well that will be able to securely hold your rifle’s magazines in place. This means you won’t have to worry about any wiggle room being left behind. Not to mention, it will make sure your magazines fit perfectly and can be released quickly when the time comes to switch out an old mag with another. Simply put, this lower receiver is simple in design and will allow you to fit your existing lower parts or replace them with new ones. This Aero Precision Lower Receiver is billet machined from 7075 T6 aluminum to mil-spec dimensions and has a matte black hardcoat anodized finish. The bolt catch is threaded for a screw pin, eliminating the need for a bolt pin. The integrated trigger guard makes the receiver more unified and durable. It features selector markings at 45, 60, and 90 degrees, which work with standard safeties, as well. The receiver fits DPMS pattern components and is good for competitive shooting and tactical uses. Who Will Use This Most This will be excellent for the sake of building your rifle from the ground up. But that doesn’t mean it’s not suitable for a simple upgrade. If you want a lower that will be excellent in quality and will be miles ahead of factory defaults, this lower might be a great choice for you. Bottom Line The Aero Precision 308 AR M5 Lower might be one of the best in terms of quality. But the fit and finish make it stand out as one of the odds-on favorites for AR-10 owners. Whether it’s for an upgrade or building a rifle from scratch, you’ll definitely put this to good use. "The Aero Precision" Lower Receiver is aesthetically pleasing and lightweight. It accepts the Aero Precision fire selector but also works with standard safeties, which is a plus. Overall, the receiver is good enough for competitions and tactical uses. Runner-up: ​ Cross Machine Tool Co., Inc. - 308 AR Stripped Billet Upper & Lower Receiver Set CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros Accepts P-mags Solid construction Good value for money Aesthetically pleasing and easy to install Cons Might require some filing/fitment "What Recent Buyers" Report Many new buyers were looking for something that would be ideal for their AR-10 building project. Sure enough, they killed two birds with one stone with this upper and lower receiver set. One user said while he needed a lower receiver, the upper receiver was exactly what he needed for the purpose of building another AR-10 rifle in the future. Other than that, the durability was solid and allowed for the fitting of lower parts that users currently had on their rifle. Why it Stands Out to Us This kit contains two of the biggest must-have parts for an AR-10 rifle. Once you have these, you’ve got a good part of the project done. All you have to do is build your rifle piece by piece. Now, are these receivers good for the purpose of just simply upgrading them? Absolutely. So you don’t have to have a building project planned in order to get this kit. If you need a lower, an upper, or both, this kit might be what you need. You can take one of the unused receivers and keep it handy just in case you need to replace it in the future. Machined for T6 aluminum, this upper and lower receiver set is perfect for hunting and tactical use. The receiver set is compatible with the DPMS platform, and the upper receiver is compatible with DPMS high-profile style .308 handguards . The magwell is EDM-cut to accept P-mags. The bolt catch assembly uses a hex head screw instead of a rolling pin for easier installation. It is a simple set of receivers to install and use. Who Will "Use This Most" This will definitely be put to good use mostly by rifle builders. But the receivers can be used for simple replacement parts. So either way, this won't be a waste of money. If you need something for an upgrade or just to get a headstart on a rifle building project, this kit is what you’ll want to invest in. Bottom Line The Cross Machine Tool Co. Upper and Lower Receiver Kit is probably going to be one of the best things you’ve bought for your AR-10. Even if you end up using one part or both, they are high in quality and will definitely extend the longevity of your rifle. They are easy to install and are made to allow for the fitting of accessories and parts. The Cross Machine Tool Co. AR-10 receiver set is of good quality and is easy-to-install. The customer support is excellent, so you can contact them if you have any issues. The receiver set is tough and great for rugged uses like hunting. 3. Black Rain Ordnance Inc. - 308 AR Stripped Upper & Lower Receiver Sets CHECK LATEST PRICE Pros DPMS-compatible Properly machined Aesthetically pleasing Upper plus lower in one set Durable and compact construction Cons No forward assist for the upper What Recent Buyers Report As expected, a lot of buyers were pretty happy with this receiver set. The upper receiver includes a rail system that users wasted little to no time using to customize their rifles. One user said the receivers were easy to install and accepted all kinds of inner parts that made the rifle function perfectly. He also added that the top rail was also cooperative when he attached a scope to it. Why it Stands Out to Us Once again, we have a set of stripped receivers for both the upper and lower half of an AR-10. So you can build an AR-10 rifle from the ground up, using the best parts possible. Alternatively, it can be great for just simply upgrading. Either way, these receivers are high in quality and will not allow for any rattling around. Whether it’s for constructing a rifle from the ground up or just replacing your factory defaults, this kit will certainly be what you’ll need for either purpose. This stripped AR-style upper and lower receiver set has been machined from 7075 T6 billet aluminum and features a matte black anodized finish. The receivers accept DPMS LR-308 pattern components, making it highly suitable for a wide range of aftermarket components. The flattop upper has a Picatinny rail to install accessories quickly. The lower has an integral trigger guard making it more compact and durable. The lower accepts DPMS-style mags, so ensure that your mags comply, before buying. It is good for all uses. The set has both upper and lower receivers, so you won't need to buy them separately. Since this is a complete lower, you need to purchase an FFL. Who Will Use This Most Builders will, in all likelihood, use this the most. But if you intend to build your rifle and fully customize it from the start, you’re going to have oodles of fun using this kit. You’ll build your rifle from one part to the next. Once you’re finished, you can add on the scopes or other accessories that will make it look rugged and beastly. Bottom Line The "Black Rain Ordnance" Inc. Upper and Lower Receiver kit is a great start for your AR-10 build or you can use them to get rid of your factory defaults and use these receivers as suitable upgrades. Regardless, they are nice to have around if you’re planning on upgrading your AR-10 little by little in the not so distant future. The Black Rain Ordnance Receiver Set has both upper and lower receivers, so you don’t have to buy them separately. These are compatible with the DPMS platform, so you can use a lot of aftermarket accessories with your rifle. The Picatinny rail sure saves you some money. Overall, it is a durable and aesthetically pleasing product. Benefits of Upgrading Your AR-10 Lower Receiver Upgrading your AR-10 lower from a factory default will indeed make your rifle stand out more. Not replacing it with a better option will mean missing out. Here are some benefits you’ll get to enjoy: Better Overall Performance Your lower will probably have a better overall performance. That’s because you’ll have newer parts that might come along with the lower receiver itself (or you can purchase them separately if you so choose). A new lower with replacement parts will definitely make shooting the rifle a lot more enjoyable. Plus, your rifle will become more reliable than ever. A Great Start to a Building Project If you are building an AR-10 from scratch, it’s no secret that a new lower will certainly serve as the centerpiece of your project. You can start from there and add on the parts you need and then work your way up. From there, you’ll be able to decide which components and parts are needed in order to make the rifle function properly. Better Durability Let’s face it, a lot of lowers are made from high-quality parts. You should be able to find a lower that can stand out as one of the best in terms of quality. This way, you won’t have to replace them for many years or decades (assuming you take great care of your rifle). Conclusion An AR-10 should be durable and tough enough to withstand the heavy .308 caliber it fires. Forged metal is always considered superior to billet metal, although it doesn’t make much of a difference with the AR-10. The DPMS platform is more versatile and has more aftermarket parts available, compared to the AR platform. Additionally, the parts of the lower receivers of the AR-10 and AR-15 are not interchangeable, except for the trigger and the trigger spring, due to size and caliber differences. Buying a complete lower requires an FFL, but you can also buy an 80% lower, and finish it yourself. However, with ready-made lowers, you get quality machining, save time, and are covered by a warranty.

Henry Rifle Overview

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s We recently shared our thoughts on the Henry Golden Boy .22 , and spoiler: we completely loved it. So, the news that Henry,  the gun manufacturer famous for their classic lever-actions, is now going to be selling through Brownells Home , one of our favorite retailers, has us pretty excited. Henry has a huge catalog, though, so with so many options to choose from, how do you know which of these beautiful and high quality rifles to choose from? Henry Repeating Arms Fortunately, we have the whole rundown of Henry’s complete current line. Let’s get started. New Original Henry Rifle New "Original Henry Rifle" The Original Henry Rifle ($1,920) is Henry’s call back to their classic 1860 frontier era rifle.   The standard model is available in .44-40 and .45 Colt specifications.  Both calibers feature a 24.5″ octagonal barrel with a 13 round capacity.  The Original Henry Rifle weighs in at 9 pounds and has a total length of 43”. The Original Henry also comes in a few special editions.  These versions have the same specs as the original, but are only available in the .44-40 caliber model: Henry Original Silver Deluxe Engraved Edition ($3,000) "Henry Original Silver" "Deluxe Engraved Edition" Henry Original Deluxe Engraved II Edition ($2,800) "Henry Original Deluxe" Engraved II Edition Original Henry Iron-Framed ($2,230) "Original Henry Iron" -Framed Lever Action .22 Henry Classic Lever Action .22 Henry’s Classic .22 ($300) is one of the most popular lever action .22s currently on the market.  The "Classic Lever Action" features a grooved receiver for mounting a scope, adjustable rear sight, and a hooded front sight.  The standard rifle weighs 5¼ pounds and is 36¼” long.  It has an 18¼” blue steel barrel with multiple groove rifling for high accuracy. The magazine can hold 15 rounds of .22 Long Rifle, 17 rounds of .22 Long and up to 21 rounds of .22 Short. In addition to the standard model, the Lever Action .22 is available in carbine and magnum versions. Lever Action Carbine .22 Rifle Henry Classic "Lever Action Carbine" .22 Rifle Henry Lever Action Carbine .22 ($300) has a length of 34″ and a 16 1/8″ barrel.  In addition, it features a large loop lever to make the carbine more easily handled by large or gloved hands. Lever Action .22 Magnum Lever Action .22 Magnum A more powerful option, the Lever Action .22 Magnum ($410) has a 19¼” barrel and a magazine that holds 11 rounds.  It weighs in at 5½ pounds and has an overall length of 37½”. Lever Action .22 Mare’s Leg Lever Action .22 Mare’s Leg Henry also offers a Mare’s leg edition ($350) of the Lever action .22.  The Mare’s leg edition features a 12 ⅞” barrel and overall length of 25”. It weighs 4.45 lbs. Lever Action Octagon Frontier Rifle Lever Action .22 Octagon Frontier Rifle The Lever Action Octagon Rifle is another frontier style lever action option from Henry.  What makes this lever action stand out is its classic 20” octagonal barrel, styled like the ones favored by those who blazed the Western Trail. "The Lever Action" Octagon Rifle is available in three calibers, the .22 LR ($370), the .22 Magnum ($450), and the 17 HMR ($450). Small Game Rifle & Carbine "Small Game Rifle" and Carbine Henry’s Small Game Rifle retains the classic style of the Frontier Rifle but pairs it with with modern a Skinner sight.  The result is a highly accurate rifle ideal for small game hunting. The Skinner sight features a solid steel rear base and fully adjustable aperture dimensioned to line up with the tall brass bead front sight. The Small Game Rifle is available in both standard and carbine versions, each of which are also available in both .22 LR and .22 magnum calibers.  Both the Small Game Rifle ($400 for .22 LR , $480 for .22 magnum ) and the Small Game Carbine ($410 for .22 LR , $480 for .22 magnum ) feature large loop levers. The Varmint Express .17 HMR Rifle Varmint Express .17 HMR Rifle "The Varmint Express" .17 HMR Rifle ($450) is a more compact option for small game hunters.  The Varmint Express features a 20” barrel, fiber optic Williams fire sights, and a checkered American walnut Monte Carlo stock.  The tubular magazine fits eleven .17 HMR cartridges. The Golden Boy Golden Boy Rifle The Golden Boy is Henry’s premium line of small game rifles.  Enthusiasts can choose a Golden Boy chambered for .22 LR ($450), .22 magnum ($490), or .17 HMR ($500). The Golden Boy Rifle boasts an American walnut stock, brass buttplate and Brasslite receiver.  The rifle features a 20” octagonal barrel.  The .22 magnum ($490) and .17 HMR ($500) options are also available for purchase with large loop levers. For firearms lovers who want a little extra something, Henry offers a variety of special edition Golden Boys that stand out from the crowd. Golden Boy Deluxe Engraved 3rd Edition Golden "Boy Deluxe Engraved" 3rd Edition In addition, Henry offers a Deluxe Engraved 3rd Edition version of each caliber option, .22 LR ($1,220), .22 magnum ($1,250), and .17 HMR ($1,270). These special edition rifles have all of the perks of the original Golden Boy rifles, but with beautiful hand engraving. Golden and Silver Eagles The Henry Silver Eagle is based on the engraved scroll and silver plated Henry Rifle that the New Haven Arms Company presented to US Secretary of the Navy under Abraham Lincoln, Gideon Welles.  Secretary Wells was a national political leader and was instrumental in the creation of the Navy’s Medal of Honor. The Silver Eagle is available chambered for .22 LR ($650), .22 magnum ($700), or .17 HMR ($670). Silver Eagle 2nd Edition and Golden Eagle For the Silver Eagle 2nd Edition ($650) and Golden Eagle ($710), Henry took a step away from Silver Eagle’s historic roots with updated engraving.  The new engraving features a soaring bald eagle surrounded by nineteenth century style scrollwork.  The Golden Eagle uses 24K gold to really allow the eagle to stand out. "The Silver Eagle" 2nd Edition and Golden Eagle are only available calibered for .22 LR. The American Beauty American Beauty Henry designed the American Beauty ($750) to honor the American woman.  The goal was to make a rifle that, like the spirit of American women, was beautiful on both the inside and out. The main panel depicts an American Beauty rose, the namesake for the rifle, above a banner reading “American Beauty.” The rose features 14K rose gold to give it the appearance of being in bloom.  The rose and banner are surrounded with floral scroll engraving. I don’t know about other American women, but I certainly appreciate a gorgeous gun designed to appeal to women without a bit of pink in sight. Golden Boy Silver Golden Boy Silver Finally, if you want to stand out in a subtler way, you can try the Golden Boy Silver. The Golden Boy silver is available chambered for .22 LR ($500), .22 magnum ($530), and .17 HMR ($550). The Big Boy Big Boy Rifle The Big Boy is the Golden Boy’s heftier counterpart.  The original style Big Boy can be chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum ($750), with .41 Magnum and .327 Federal Magnum options available soon.  Carbines (16” barrels) chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum ($750) are also available. All caliber versions of the Big Boy are SASS approved, making it an excellent option for Cowboy Action shooting . The Big Boy features a 20” octagonal barrel, as well as a fully adjustable semi-buckhorn rear sight with a reversible white diamond insert and a brass beaded front sight.  A brass barrel band and receiver couple with the American walnut stock to give the Big Boy Henry’s signature classic appearance. However, if you’re looking for an alternative aesthetic, Henry also offers several special lines of Big Boys with distinctive appearances. Big Boy Deluxe Engraved 3rd Edition Big Boy Deluxe Engraved 3rd Edition The Big Boy Deluxe Engraved 3rd Edition rifles take the already beautiful Big Boy rifles a step higher with gorgeous hand engraving.  These rifles are available in .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum versions. Big Boy Steel Big Boy Steel Rifle and Carbine Big Boy Steel rifles are available chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , .357 Magnum , and .41 Magnum ($700).  Carbines are available chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum ($700). Big Boy Silver Big Boy Silver Big Boy Silver rifles are available chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum ($820). Big Boy Silver rifles are also available with deluxe hand engraving, chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum ($1,570). Big Boy Special Editions Big Boy Cowboy and Wildlife Special Editions Finally, Henry has released two commemorative special edition versions of the Big Boy. The Cowboy ($1,090) celebrates the hard-working cowpunchers and wranglers who risked their lives in the American West. The Wildlife ($1,080) recognizes America’s rich hunting heritage, as well as the birds and beasts that make that heritage possible. Painted and Engraved Stocks Each features a beautifully engraved and hand painted walnut stock and forearm.  Both are worthy of display in any home . Big Boy Mare’s Leg Big Boy Mares Leg The Big Boy is also available as a mare’s leg, with versions chambered for .44 Magnum , .45 Colt , and .357 Magnum ($800). The “Long Ranger” Long Ranger with and without Sight The Long Ranger is Henry’s first venture into the long range hunting rifle game.  Henry produces this rifle in .223 Remington , .243 Winchester , and .308 Winchester ($850). Henry retains their timeless lever action, but keeps it modern with a geared action that drives a machined and chromed bolt with six-lug rotary head for improved reliability.  The Long Ranger also features a 20” free floating barrel for excellent precision.  The detachable box magazine a steel floorplate and a blackened steel release button on the right side of the receiver. Large Caliber Lever Actions In addition to their more traditional lever action options, Henry also offers a couple larger caliber options. .45-70 Lever Action The .45-70 Lever Action is available with a steel finish and 18.43” round barrel ($700) as well as with a brass finish and 22” octagon barrel ($770).  It has a four round capacity. .30-30 Lever Action The .30-30 Lever Action is also available in both a steel finish with a round barrel ($700) and a brass finish with an octagon barrel ($770).  Both barrel styles are 20” and both guns have a five round capacity. The .45-70 and the .30-30 are both ideal for large game hunting. Both boast a brass bead front sight and a fully adjustable semi-buckhorn rear sight with diamond insert.  Both are drilled and tapped to make adding a scope easy. Like with the Big Boy and Golden Boy, Henry makes a few alternative versions of their large caliber lever action rifles. All-Weather Lever Action All- "Weather Lever Action" These rifles may look great, but the changes Henry made when creating the All-Weather versions of the Lever Action .30-30 and Lever Action .45-70 ($830) are all about practicality. The metal bits of the All-Weather Lever Actions are made of steel plated with hard chrome, resistant to flaking, chipping, peeling, and corrosion.  On top of that, Henry uses a treatment to increase surface hardness, reduce friction, and resist scuffing and scratching. Instead of Henry’s traditional American walnut, the wood on these rifles is stained hardwood topped with a coating that helps the rifle resist wear, scratches, moisture, and changes in temperature. Both calibers of the All-Weather Lever Action have round barrels. Color Case Hardened Editions "Color Case Hardened" Editions The Color Case Hardened Editions of the Lever Action .30-30 and Lever Action .45-70 ($830) allow owners to have the same accurate and reliable rifle, but with a more subtle and nostalgic finish than the standard brass or steel versions.  The Color Case Hardened rifles have octagonal barrels. Wildlife Editions Brass Wildlife Editions These Wildlife Editions pay tribute to the large game that made survival possible for those who blazed West. Left Side of Brass .30-30 The brass Wildlife Editions provide a clean, classic look.  The .30-30 Wildlife Edition ($1,050) depicts a buck’s head on the right side and a leaping buck on the left.  Both are surrounded by American vine scrollwork. Left Side of Brass .45-70 The .45-70 Wildlife Edition features a moose head on the right and a bear on the left.  Again, both are surrounded by American vine scrollwork. Steel Wildlife Editions For more drama, the steel framed Wildlife Editions use 24K gold to put their animal subjects in high relief. Like the brass version, the steel frame is available in both .30-30 ($1,190) and .45-70 ($1,180) calibers.  Each features the same engraving as its brass counterpart. Pump Action Octagon Rifle Pump "Action Octagon Rifle" The Pump Action Octagon Rifle combines the American classic pump action with the Henry classic octagon barrel.  It features a grooved receiver for mounting a scope and semi-buckhorn fully adjustable rear sights with standard 3/8″ dovetail slots, allowing users to switch out sights if they wish. The Pump Action Octagon Rifle is available in .22 LR ($450) and .22 Magnum ($480). U.S. Survival AR-7 Henry U.S. Survival AR-7 Rifles The Henry AR-7 is an ideal rifle for backcountry sportsmen and women, whether bush pilots, backpackers, or boaters. The Henry AR-7 is chambered in .22 LR, weighs just 3.5 lbs, and has a full length of 35”. It also shrinks down to just 16.5” in length when all components are stowed in the impact and water resistant stock.  This makes the rifle virtually unparalleled as a compact and durable option. Stowed U.S. Survival AR-7 The Henry AR-& is available in matte black ($230) and camouflage ($290). Boy Scouts of America Editions As you’ve probably figured out by now, Henry loves tribute editions of their rifles.  As the sister of two Eagle Scouts and a former member of the Boy Scouts myself, through the coed Venturing program, these particular tributes have a place close to my heart. All of these rifles are based on a preexisting Henry rifle, so I’m not going to go into detail about the particular specs of each one.  What unifies them, however, is that they support the same great program, and would all make a great gift for a Boy Scout or Eagle Scout in your life. Big Boy “Order of the Arrow” Centennial Edition ($1,220) Big Boy “Order of the "Arrow” Centennial Edition" Golden Boy Eagle Scout Tribute Edition ($870) Golden "Boy Eagle Scout" Tribute Edition Golden Boy Salute to Scouting Edition ($930) Golden Boy Salute to Scouting Edition Special Edition Philmont Scout Ranch Frontier .22 ($550) "Special Edition Philmont" "Scout Ranch Frontier" .22 Big Boy Eagle Scout Centennial Tribute Edition ($1,220) Big Boy Eagle Scout "Centennial Tribute Edition" Worker Tribute Editions I’m going to wrap up my overview of Henry rifles with one last group of tribute rifles. This time, Henry is honoring the various workers without which the America we know today would not be possible. All of these rifles are based on the Golden Boy and, like the Boy Scout tributes above, they all make great gifts. Military Service Tribute 2nd Edition ($95 0) "Military Service Tribute" 2nd Edition American Farmer Tribute Edition ($830) American "Farmer Tribute Edition" Law Enforcement Tribute Edition ($830) Law "Enforcement Tribute Edition" Firefighters Tribute Edition ($830) "Firefighters Tribute Edition" Trucker’s Tribute Edition ($830) "Trucker’s Tribute Edition" Also available in a Big Boy version ($1,220). American Railroad Tribute Edition ($830) American "Railroad Tribute Edition" Coal Miner Tribute Edition ($830) Coal "Miner Tribute Edition" EMS Tribute Edition ($830) EMS Tribute Edition Freemasons Tribute Edition ($830) "Freemasons Tribute Edition" The American Oilman Tribute Edition ($1,150) "American Oilman Tribute" Edition Finishing Touches Now that we’ve covered all of your Henry rifle options, which are now more conveniently available thanks to Brownells, what do you think? Are there any Henry rifles that you’re particularly excited about?  Did this list help you discover any new rifles?  Any favorites already in your collection?  Let me know in the comments!

Summary

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