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Spanish and English training, on-site language seminars, esl products, translations and workplace English

On site spanish and english training including workplace english programs and seminars

On site spanish and english training including workplace english programs and seminarsWorkplace Languages offers customized Survival Spanish seminars, classes (or other languages) to management in a variety of industries. We also teach a very functional workplace English to those employees with limited English proficiency. Our classes and seminars are always taught on-site at the company 24/7. All classes, English and Spanish seminars are taught on-site at your place of business and the curriculum is always customized to meet the needs of your company. All information is practical and no grammar is taught. Classes & seminars are upbeat; nobody is put on the spot and we understand that you only want enough Spanish, Chinese, French whatever language it is - to communicate immediately, easily & effectively. We understand that you dont want to be a language major. You just want to get your point across.Workplace Languages offer a large number of bilingual training tools to a variety of industries. They are all ultra easy-to-use and are all customizable with content and we can even add your companys logo. Whats nice about our bilingual training tools is that there is nothing to retain, no classes to attend and no huge time or financial commitment. We have pocket-sized survival language booklets that come with a pronunciation guide. And our 24 X 36 color laminated poster has both Survival English for the Spanish speakers and also Survival Spanish for the non Spanish-speaking managers & supervisors.Successful communication has always been the key to good management. Now, with an ever increasing need to connect with workers from other cultures, the need is even greater for both managers and employees to educate themselves in each others ways of acting, speaking, learning foreign languages using as method English or Spanish seminars. The rewards are potentially great if the methods that both parties use to educate themselves are appropriate. Success doesnt necessarily take a great deal of time, it takes the right training.

Whos the First Person to Greet Your Customer?

Whos the First Person to Greet Your Customer?

I approached her sliding glass window and stood in back of a gentleman whom I assumed she was helping. After about three minutes, I realized he was waiting for the office manager and she could have acknowledged my presence. I stepped up to the window; she did not say good morning; she did not smile; she just glared at me. I started to speak; she pointed a finger at a clip board with a paper to fill out. I placed the completed sheet in front of her, perhaps expecting a thank you or a smile or at least have a seat; the doctor will see you soon.I was so intrigued by her manner that I watched her interaction with the other patients. The man sitting next to me started to tell me that even though he had an appointment he had been waiting a long time. He told me he was extremely dissatisfied with the way the place was run and was starting to regret his association with this office. With a bit of humor, I told him I was watching the receptionist and asked if she had uttered a word to him. He started to laugh, and said, Come to think of it, not a word! The next patient to come in was an older woman with a walker. The receptionist was not at her desk so the woman took a seat and waited for her return. She again pointed at the clip board, took the form, threw her sliding glass door closed and said nothing. The next one was the mailman, who Im sure she sees daily. Again, not a smile or a hello; she stuck out her hand for the mail and handed him the outgoing mail.Now my new disgruntled friend and I were sort of enjoying this and decided that maybe she was a mute.and then it happened. A good-looking UPS delivery man came in. Lo and behold, there was a big smile and a voice that was able to say good morning! That was short lived. She treated the rest of the patients in her same rude uncaring manner, a total lack of personality.To me, the ability to positively interact with the customer, no matter what the business, is most essential. Hire your receptionist with as much thought as you would hire a sales person. Some smart person once said If today you give a stranger one of your smiles, it might be the only sunshine he sees all day.

Build a Better Online Press Kit

Build a Better Online Press Kit

Some recent surveys of journalists and reporters indicate that most prefer to use online media rooms/press kits as opposed to the old-fashioned hard copy press kits. Why? The Internet is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A busy reporter on deadline can log on and cruise from one online press kit to the next without having to wait for an overnight package or fax. Many businesses and publicists are embracing this new technology in media relations and are in a mad dash to develop "online press kit" s of their own or for their clients. Like a Web site, an online press kit should contain certain elements, should make some features more prominent than others, and be simple to navigate. Here are some dos and donts to consider before you dive in and begin creating an online press kit.Online press kits Should:Be easy to locate if linked to a main Web site. For instance, if ABC Bottled Water has a public or consumer Web site already established, a separate "media room" can be linked to the Web sites home page. This link must appear prominently either in the sites menu or on the home page. Reporters dont have time to search for it. Also, if the media room is linked to a main site, the media room should share the main sites look and feel, so that reporters dont feel link theyve been forwarded to some unrelated site. Provide materials commonly used by the media. A general press kit usually contains a backgrounder, FAQ, and profiles of key individuals/spokespeople. This is what a reporter will want to see when he or she visits your online media room. The purpose of providing these common documents is to minimize any extra work a reporter will need to do to get what he/she needs. Other important items to include are high-resolution, digital photos, high-resolution digital logo graphics, and of course, press releases. A good online media room will come equipped with a media library where all types of files can be uploaded, stored, and distributed, including general press kit materials.Include the media coverage already received. When a company, organization, or individual has been covered by the media (preferably favorably), it helps to legitimize them. Be careful about copyright issues when reposting articles, though. If you or your organization has appeared in the media, use anything from audio clips, video clips, and links to media outlets Web sites in your online media rooms In the News page. Check with the media venue for reprint permission.Include media contact information prominently. If the person handling "media relations" is not an employee of the company/organization, be sure that the contact info in the online media room directs reporters to the person who is. If a reporter reaches out and his/her request is lost in cyberspace, chances are, they wont come back. Online Press Kits Should Not: Combine info for both the public AND the media. Ideally, the information provided for the media should be separate from content intended for the public or consumers. One reason is that it makes it more difficult for the media to find what it wants, and another is because it reduces your control over the info provided to the media. Messaging is very important, and while it can sometimes vary for the public, it should always be consistent for the media after all, your messaging is what theyre using to cover you with.Require a reporter to make numerous requests for additional info. There are always going to be some things that you do not want to provide online on a constant basis. This could include certain photos or ebooks. Keeps these instances to a minimum! In cases like these, it is fine to say please contact us for photos of this event, or please contact us for a sample ebook. Some media rooms have very limited file space, which may require you to upload low-resolution photos to save space. Asking reporters to contact you for high-resolution photos is all right, too. The point of an online [*_*] is to provide the media with most of what it needs. Be out of date. Update press kit materials as needed, and try to keep a current press release available even if it wasnt distributed on the wire or to reporters directly. By keeping a timely supply of news, in your [*_*], it will be obvious to the media that it receives your attention.Other Helpful Tips:Use links not e-mail attachments! Media rooms with media libraries should allow you to upload your documents and create a URL to their location online, which you can provide to the media instead of an e-mail attachment. When was the last time you opened an e-mail from a stranger that had an attachment? Have a blog? Link it to your online [*_*]. Blogs are a great way to discuss your company, cause, or industry and are often used by members of the media when researching someone/something for a story. If you have one, add the link to your [*_*]. If you dont have one, consider getting one. By following these tips and by putting yourself in the shoes of a journalist, you will be able to develop an online presence that is both informative and convenient. Do this and youll meet the demands of the media and increase the likelihood of gaining editorial exposure.

Games are a Reflection of Behavior as Told by John Satta

Games are a Reflection of Behavior as Told by John Satta

You are standing on a small stage yelling, What's the name of the game?!Win as much as you can!!! comes roaring back.Who's responsible for your score?!I am!!The audience is composed of ninety men, all prisoners in a federal maximum security prison.One more thing - you're a woman.For three years, Alicia volunteered every Thursday at FCI (Federal Correctional Institute) in Bastrop, Texas-I used my skills as a corporate trainer to help these men learn to shift their perspective on themselves and the world.Along the way the prisoners taught me as much, perhaps more, than I taught them.In my training business, I use games as a way to break down barriers and shift perceptions. What I came to realize is that your behavior in a game is an exaggerated reflection of your behavior in real life.Games are an opening to behave true to our natures, to react immediately rather than with a careful response. Depending on the other players, we may monitor our behavior less in a game than in the real world, but we aren't acting differently. In a game there are no emotional holds barred.In a game, we are allowed to be more right brained than logical. After all, It's only a game.Saying something is only a game tends to trivialize its importance. Precisely because we view it as trivial, and of no importance, we can give ourselves permission to let our true natures out.When we floated this idea before a number of colleagues, several of them told us stories of self-discovery. One woman, a very sweet and kind person in real life, was known as the enforcer when she played hockey in school. Another shared that, when she plays a game against total strangers she becomes brutal and highly competitive.So if our true nature comes out in a game, what can we do with that information?Can we transform situations so that we can be true to our nature? Can we make a game out of real world situations to allow our true nature to flourish? The obvious example is to view business as a game to be won. This implies competition and a winner take all attitude.Yet Covey and others have told us about creating win-win situations. Is there such a thing as a win-win game - a game where everyone wins, where no one loses? Can you devise a game where you can put your competitive streak toward a larger goal? Can the proverbial pie be made larger? As someone said to me, to transform from me winning to we winning.What's the name of the game? Win as much as you can!Who's responsible for your score? I am!The game Alicia played with the inmates was called the handshake game. She had them pair up by size, height and weight and explained the rules. We'll play the game for 45 seconds. You get one point when your hand taps his hip; he gets one point when his hand taps your hip.The vast majority of the pairs had a combined score of 0 points. A few pairs scored in the 10 - 20 point range.But one pair scored 260 points.The high scorers had realized that the name of the game and scoring responsibility did not define a win-lose (or zero-sum) game. That is, one person did not win at the expense of the other.Of course, the entire thing was a set-up. Alicia paired them up by size, height and weight to set the expectation that it was an evenly matched contest. She got them chanting to get their excitement up.And she neglected to tell them that the pair was a team and the team members' scores would be combined.Deliberately I didn't tell them they were supposed to cooperate with their partner. I also never told them who the competitors were.We all know that a formal team must cooperate to win. The revelation here was that by cooperating they could maximize their individual scores.What's the name of the game? Win as much as you can!Who's responsible for your score? I am!The rules say nothing about preventing the other person from getting a high score. The pair who got it quickly settled into a rhythm of one for you and one for me. And they could have kept that up for as long as the game ran. Meanwhile, the other teams were struggling and would have exhausted themselves long before the winners did. And, when the few teams who did spot the pair who got it there were charges of cheating leveled at them. We saw what they were doing but thought they were cheating or didn't understand the rules. The cooperation - competition confusion is nicely summed up in the concept called the prisoners' dilemma. Two people are arrested for a crime and there is enough evidence to put them both in jail for 1 year.The police keep them isolated from each other and offer each the same deal: If one of you talks and the other does not, the snitch goes free and the other one gets 3 years. If you both talk, you both get 2 years.The partners can work together (by staying silent) and both get only a year in jail. By both defecting from the partnership to work with the police they will both get 2 years.A single defector will go free while the one who cooperated gets 3 years.The dilemma is formed by pitting trust against greed. The temptation of greed combined with a habit of competition blinds us to a different perspective.But don't think that only prisoners are subject to this. When Alicia has had groups of corporate executives play this game, they fall into the same behavior pattern as the prisoners. In fact, in some corporate sessions nobody gets it.There seems to be a dichotomy between competing and winning. The idea of cooperating to win seems odd. In fact, we see other players complain that the ones who get it are cheating!What you do depends on your view of the game. If the game is seen as a one-time event, why not be brutal - there will be no consequences. But if this event is one in a series, then cooperation is clearly the better long-term strategy, if only because there will be a chance for the other to get even.In studies of prisoners' dilemma style games (played for points and not reduced jail time) the players eventually settle into a strategy dubbed tit for tat. Their actions are saying, If you cooperate last time, I'll cooperate next time. If you defected last time, I'll defect next time.Using the word defect helps us see the shift - the opposite of cooperating (working on the same side) is defecting to the other side.The desire to compete and the desire to win are not the same.Game terminology (strategies, tactics, moves, etc.) is often applied to serious parts of life. Because the word game has a connotation of triviality, we sometimes bristle at its use to describe the things that mean the most to us.What if we kept in mind that 'it's all a game' - would we behave differently?Philosopher James P. Carse writes in the first chapter of Finite and Infinite Games, There are at least two kinds of games. One could be called finite, the other infinite. A finite game is played for the purpose of winning, and infinite game for the purpose of continuing the play.The book's subtitle is A Vision of Life as Play and Possibility. His premise is that a game is about the relationship between the player.In the book he characterizes two types of players. Finite players play within the rules, infinite players play with the rules. Finite players play to end the game (with their victory), infinite players play to continue the game (by whatever means they see fit). Finite players play to win, infinite players play to keep playing.The players who get it are playing with the rules looking to transform a finite game into an infinite one.If this article has intrigued you we encourage you to look at the various games that you are playing and with whom. Who are your teammates and what kind of game are you playing? With increased awareness of our behavior, and the behavior of others, we are able to create a win as much as WE can mentality. Copyright 2004 Alicia Smith Consulting & Training. All Rights Reserved.

One of America's brightest leaders and thinkers

Marshawn Evans, J.D., has garnered a reputation as an inspiring, articulate and intelligent orator. In the same mode as multitalented trailblazing women such as Oprah Winfrey, Katie Couric, Tyra Banks and Kimora Lee Simmons, Marshawn is a: media personality, distinguished entrepreneur, passionate youth advocate, inspirational speaker and up-and-coming litigator.Marshawn emerged into national consciousness as the 3rd runner-up for Miss America. Her fame continued to grow after her coveted stint as one of Donald Trump's handpicked cast members on NBC's popular show, "The Apprentice." Marshawn has become a growing fixture in the media, having appeared across a wide-spectrum of leading TV, magazine, radio, newspaper and internet outlets, including ABC, VH1, MTV, Glamour and USA Today.As Founder of Communication Counts, Marshawn travels around the country working with politicians, athletes, entertainers and media personalities to enhance their communicative skills. Recently, Marshawn launched an upscale clothing operation called JewelME Couture. In her entrepreneurial roles, Marshawn combines the elegant, ambassadorial style that won her the interview for the Miss America competition, with an assertive business brawn and savvy.Marshawn's passion advocating for young people spawns from her own youth in which she was labeled a problem child. Her avid work with youth has won her prestigious awards and recognition from the U.S. Department of Justice and from former Texas Governor George W. Bush. Marshawn's influence on youth issues stretches beyond U.S. Borders as she served as an Ambassador to the International Summit of Achievement in Dublin, Ireland. At the summit, Marshawn presented on best practices for training future leaders, with the likes of former United States President Bill Clinton, former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev, actor James Earl Jones and international human rights activist Steve Bono.A consummate professional speaker, Marshawn's client list includes the likes of Rotary International, Clear Channel, The National Youth Network, Florida State University, and numerous corporations, municipalities, nonprofits, churches and universities. Some of her seminar and keynote topics have included, "The Art of Project Management, Lessons Learned from the Board Room", "Hand-in-Hand: Youth and Adult Partnerships" and "Skirts in the Board Room: Challenges Facing Women in the Workplace."After distinguishing herself as a top graduate from Georgetown University, one of the nation's premier legal educational institutions, Marshawn took a position as an attorney for one of Atlanta's top law firms. Apart from practicing law, this young business leader and woman of conviction is currently completing work on an upcoming book, inspirational CD and DVD. Her clear ideas, enthusiasm, humility and attention to detail make her one of the rising personalities in the communication and entertainment industry.This Speaker's Upcoming Events Sat - Jun 10 "Marshawn Evans" and Jeff Johnson participate in a Teen Summit at the 100 Black Men ConferenceSun - Jun 18Marshawn Evans host the Miss Georgia PageantEvent Type: Public Appearance Mon - Jun 19Marshawn Evans host the Miss Georgia PageantEvent Type: Public Appearance Tue - Jun 20Marshawn Evans host the Miss Georgia Pageantwww.4thdimensionmanagement.com

Are You Ignoring Your Customers' Requests?

Copyright 2006 Willie CrawfordMany Internet marketing experts will tell you that the best way to find out what your customers want from you is to ask them. While that may be true, I believe that an even more accurate way is to just listen to what they're telling you, and to what they're asking you for.To illustrate my point, I'll use a couple of examples from one of my own niches... the recipe and cookbook niche. If you already have even a minor foothold in any niche, my experience should be somewhat instructive.In-case you're unfamiliar with my background, I earn six-figures from a soul food cookbook that I wrote and self-published. I wrote that cookbook because my site visitors asked for it.The full story behind my first cookbook is that, when I first came online in 1996, I was told that I should focus on a niche. After building your typical "Internet marketing" site, which didn't really take off immediately, I eventually decided to build a site around the "soul food" recipes that I learned while growing up on a farm in North Carolina. I posted a few of my favorite recipes online as search engine bait, and then advertised affiliate products around the site ... usually with banners.I was also told that I needed a mailing list to bring visitors back to the site, and to stay in touch with potential customers. With a recipe site, it made perfect sense to me to create a list where people could trade recipes. That list was an immediate hit, and has been going strong for over 8 years.While the recipes sent out through the list were primarily from site visitors, list members grew to associate me with great recipes. They eventually started asking me if I had a cookbook. I told them "no" but that I would write one if they would buy it. I also announced that I was taking advance orders (to verify the demand). I had over 100 orders before I wrote the first word. That cookbook has provided me, and my family, with a comfortable living for YEARS!Over the years, I tried to sell those site visitors, and list members, a variety of different backend products, but nothing sold as well as my cookbook.For the last six years,list members have regularly told me what my next few products should be, but I wasn't really listening. List members regularly emailed me saying that they loved my recipes, but that they were on restricted diets. They often asked if I had diabetic, low-fat or low-carb recipes. They also often wrote to tell me that they'd been diagnosed with high blood pressure, and asked if I had any recipes for people with hypertension.When I finally started listening, I knew exactly what my next 4-5 products should be. They should be versions of my cookbook featuring diabetic, low-fat and low-carb recipes. I also needed to write a cookbook for those with high blood pressure. All of those cookbooks will be rolled out to my list and sites within the next 2 months!What's also instructive is that over the years I built up this HUGE asset... people who have bought cookbooks from me and then asked if I had more. They were telling me what to sell them. They were telling me that if I just offered them what they WANTED they would buy it.The above is just applying basic common sense and a little bit of marketing know-how ...which most Internet marketers already possess. Let me share with you a few more insights that you probably already have but are not using.1) The easiest way in the world to make more money from a proven, profitable niche is to "go deep." Produce multiple episodes or versions of the product. That's what movie producers do. That's what traditional book publishers do. Look at the "Chicken Soup For The Soul" series! That told me that if I produced additional versions of my cookbook, it would sell. My list members also "told" me that.The way that I will apply this is by re-labeling my first cookbook "Volume 1" during the next printing. Then, I will introduce "Volume 2" and as many volumes as the market will bear over the years. Labeling the original "Volume 1" tells my customers to look for additional volumes. It sets up collectors to collect the complete series.Speaking of collectors, another version of your product that you can release is a limited collectors' edition... if appropriate for your marketplace. The co-producer and host of the television cooking show that I'll tell you about later is doing just that. At my prompting, he's released a "Limited Edition Autographed Version" of his cookbook, "The Devotional Cookbook." You can see how he did that with my help at: http://Chitterlings.com/devotionalcookbook.htmlWhat will make the limited editon of the cookbook, in the example above, sell out really fast is the fact that it really is only being released in a very limited quantity, and that a television personality is autographing copies. Ask yourself how you can apply a similar idea to your product. I'll admit that this idea isn't something that I dreamed up... it's somethings that I heard a speaker use as an example at a seminar. All I did was have my client APPLY the idea!2) Go deep by offering more versions of your basic product. For example, with my cookbook, I offer it in PDF, print, and on CD. In a few months many of my recipes will be available on DVD since I will share them on a television cooking show that I'll be co-producing.My mentors long ago told me that I needed not only a cooking show, but a full line of spices and sauces. Instead of listening to them, I went off in search of more exotic markets... largely ignoring the hungry market that I already had (pun intended).It took one of my clients, coming to me with an idea for a cooking show that he had, to get me into the television business. When you really think about it though, producing a cooking show is just repackaging the information that I already have into a different format.Listening to my market, will not only allow me to triple my book sales, it will also generate millions when the show is nationally syndicated. The show is just beginning production now, but will grow rapidly. You can follow our progress, and learn from the process, by frequenting our blog at: http://TheDevotionalChef.com/blogYou can also see how I develop and market a full line of cookbooks and related products by visiting my cooking site at: http://Chitterlings.com Go ahead and join the mailing list, as this is where I announce new products and site news.A few people may ask why I share so much of what I'm doing in my cooking niche with you here. You may wonder if I'm not afraid of competition. The fact is that there are MILLIONS of webpages out there offering free recipes, yet I earn six-figures selling them. The fact is that there are thousands of people who have written cookbooks and are having difficulty selling them. I don't have to worry about competition because by studying Internet marketing I have learned how to dominate my niche.What should you do with the information that I've just shared with you? Ask yourself how you can apply it in your niche. Ask yourself if your site visitors and subscribers aren't already telling you what they want to buy!Once you discover that your product is a hit with the marketplace, listen to them as they tell you how to improve the product, and how to sell more things to them. Instead of going off looking for new and more glamorous markets, serve the one that you've already mastered. Apply the many marketing techniques you already know to your existing niche. It will pay off handsomely!

Summary

Spanish and English training, on-site language seminars, esl products, translations and workplace English